Chris Brown is Not the Victim

On August 30th, 2016, at approximately 11:52AM PST, Christopher “Chris” Maurice Brown was contended with a standoff with law enforcement when Los Angeles Police Department’s SWAT team was convoked to Brown’s California homestead following a purported altercation with another woman involving a weapon. Allegedly, she had arrived at Brown’s household unsolicited alongside an otherwise welcome guest, thus prompting an argument between herself and Brown. He became infuriated and physical, threatening her with a gun.

Initially, with reference to complex.com, the LAPD would not affirm whether a search warrant was being attained, but an authorized spokesperson did acknowledge the investigation, “All I can confirm right now is that our Robbery/Homicide Division is handling [the] incident that occurred at Chris Brown’s house earlier.”

Since, LAPD has retrieved a duffel bag with the contents composed of the weapon in question, as well as unidentified drug substances, which was heaved from Brown’s window. He, however, remained barricaded within his residence, uploading Instagram (@chrisbrown) videos reflecting on the subject matter.

The incident is unastonishing, for Brown has a substantial “rap sheet” of criminal activity dating to 2009, when he pled guilty for assaulting ex-girlfriend Rihanna preceding the year’s Grammy awards. Moreover, in 2013, he was incarcerated for assaulting a fan, and succeedingly admitted himself into rehabilitation for anger management and drug abuse. Recently, in June of 2016, Mike G, Brown’s previous manager filed a lawsuit against him for—you guessed it—assault; however, this legal case is presently unsettled.

Amidst the newscasting of the circumstances, there have a nauseating abundance of individuals who have defended Brown, posting an assortment of, “leave the poor guy alone’s” and, “he merely needs help, not prison time’s.”

Chris Brown, although a lucrative musical artist in spite of his delinquency, is not the victim of himself.

In 2012, legal documents of Brown’s assault toward Rihanna transpired to the public. An excerpt from the International Business Times chronicles, “A verbal argument ensued and Brown pulled the vehicle over on an unknown street, reached over Robyn F. with his right hand, opened the car door and attempted to force her out. Brown was unable to force Robyn F. out of the vehicle because she was wearing a seat belt. When he could not force her to exit, he took his right hand and shoved her head against he passenger window of the vehicle, causing an approximate one-inch raised circular contusion.

Robyn F. turned to face Brown and he punched her in the left eye with his right hand. He then drove away in the vehicle and continued to punch her in the face with his right hand while steering the vehicle with his left hand. The assault caused Robyn F.’s mouth to fill with blood and blood to splatter all over her clothing and the interior of the vehicle.Brown looked at Robyn F. and stated, ‘I’m going to beat the sh- out of you when we get home! You wait and see!’”

Is that article an implication of a victim? Or alternatively, a career abuser?

Conventionally, there prevails a despicable tendency to safeguard criminalized abusers, sexual assaulters—the list is innumerable. We, subsisting as that society, are in possession of a capability to decline the toxicity of that “norm”, and instead, make popular an ideology of defending their victims; their survivors. They are deserving of that much.

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