Mental Illnesses in Third World Countries Do Not Matter

Mental Illnesses in Third World Countries Do Not Matter

We often hear about the pride we, as an individualistic society, a First World culture, carry to fight back at mental illness. This is not a reality, let alone a dream for individuals suffering in more collectivist, foreign cultures, even those residing in the United States.

Much denunciation is shared towards mental illness, especially in cultures which are not as developed socially.

I am Sudanese. I know what this is like. It is countries like Sudan and North Sudan which I want to point out when it comes to a topic as touchy as mental illness. It is uncommon to find that our people are openly suffering from bipolar-depression, schizophrenia and so forth. That is the truth. However, that is seen as stupid. It is wrong to believe that something is wrong with you, it is an embarrassment.

I am proud to be a Sudanese-American, however, I must speak on the issues using the freedom of speech I’m granted the right in this country, with my motive to secure those in other countries who are silenced by force.

I don’t see many stories about issues pertaining to this situation but that doesn’t make it any less important than anything else. I know that foreigners will relate because outside of our American society, awareness for mental illness is unpopular. In fact, it is looked down upon. The facts about the existence and importance of mental illness can be found literally anywhere, online or in psychology books.

It is frustrating to know that we are suffering, but forbidden from therapy.

I’m here to open up for everyone who cannot. I’m here to say that it sucks that we have to go through life without being allowed to present awareness for mental illness without triggering a positive and progressive response. I’m here to persuade, perhaps, everyone who reads this that can relate to and/or support this message to go out and create a movement to change the idea held in Third World cultures which prevents the alleviation and awareness of mental illness.

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