Brazil is going through a delicate moment. The presidential elections have never been as polarized and controversial as 2018’s have been.

On one side, there is Haddad. A leftist candidate who has a speech that resonates with social commitment, but at the same time, whose political party (“PT”) has had involvement with corruption and money laundering over the years.

On the other side, there is Bolsonaro. A self-proclaimed conservative, with speeches of hatred and prejudice going left and right, whose political party (though is less well- known) has too, involvement with corruption.

Seeing what has been going around on the streets of the country since the elections began has been terrorizing. Bolsonaro’s supporters have followed his speech to the letter, promoting acts of violence such as the assassination of Capoeira master Môa, the carving of a suastica on a young woman’s body because of her shirt “Ele não”, the running over of a man because of his shirt that had an image of “Lula”, and many more other cases that have only confirmed the idea that Bolsonaro is definitely not the best option for Brazil right now (or ever).

I have heard talk around me justifying their pro-Bolsonaro vote with their hate for Haddad’s political party because of their history with corruption, and I understand that. What I don’t understand, though,  is how someone can see so many people being assaulted because of this man and then thinking that the violence won’t escelate if he gets elected. Someone’s hatred for “PT” can override the need for basic human rights, and that makes me truly afraid of what a big portion of the Brazilian population is capable of.

Unfortunately, the country has lost the privilege of having corruption as a priority. The person one should vote for should at least acknowledge the right that every human being -despite ethnicity, sexuality, and gender- has the right to live without being constantly harassed or judged.

It is incredibly disappointing to find that almost 50% of Brazil’s population is either fascist or has a clear problem with prioritizing. Especially since the country has such a marked history with 1964’s military coup (that by the way, Bolsonaro denies); a time when Brazil experienced a violent and authoritarian conduct and people were highly censored and persecuted.

People must open their eyes and go beyond political parties and preferences.The future of tons of people is in Brazilian’s hands and they need to understand that just because something isn’t a problem for them, it doesn’t mean it isn’t a problem for someone else. That means looking beyond their own houses, beyond their own families and friends, and into the bigger picture of the future. It is a promise: Brazil will suffer if this man is elected.

 

photo credit: FAMÍLIA BOLSONARO

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